Thames Barges and a Sunderland Flying Boat!

I do like to paint fairly vibrant landscapes and seascapes and normally they are watercolours on 300gsm Rough Arches Paper. The first painting is on Arches Hot Pressed 300gsm paper which leads itself to this softer wash type painting.

However this post is just a little different and features Thames Barges, and as an update now includes a  SHORTS Sunderland Flying Boat!

I have included this new painting of Rochester in Kent showing some barges and the scene as it may have been the late 1930’s when the Shorts Sunderland Flying boats were designed and built by the River Medway at Rochester. They were designed in the 1930s and first flew in 1937. Based on the Shorts S23 Empire flying boats, the Flagship of Imperial Airways it was re-engineered for military use, and was used extensively in the Second World War.  777 were produced in the years 1937 to 1946.

IMG_2104

 

The next painting of Thames Barges is titled is “Waiting for the Tide” and is 16 inches by 12.

IMG_2081

                                                    Waiting for the Tide.   A watercolour.

 

IMG_2082

Barge passing Upnor Castle in Kent

This 3rd painting is hot off the press having been painted recently too! It shows a Thames barge passing by Upnor Castle on the River Medway, not too far from my studio. Again painted on Hot Pressed paper and 16 inches by 12.

The fourth painting is much more in my normal style and is of Barge at Hollowshore, here in Kent in the UK. It was painted a couple of years ago. It is on Rough 300gsm Arches paper and is 14 inches by 10.

Barge at Hollowshore

                                              A Thames Barge at Hollowshore in Kent.

This  painting is of Faversham creek where barges were once seen in their dozens.

IMG_6547

                                                                                             Barges at Faversham

The last  painting was painted many years ago and is on a medium smooth paper and is about 18 inches by 10.

I don’t think I would paint it like this today (busy sky, busy boats and busy sea) but again it is Thames Barges, this time racing in the Thames Estuary.

Kent, The Barge Race

                                                                           The Barge Race.

I hope you like this post and its updates. Thames barges are always a wonderful sight to see around our coast. Alas Sunderland flying boats are now not seen flying but one I believ is in amuseum in Florida.

Happy Travelling

Brian

About brianswatercolours

After spending 40 years in Aerospace I now enjoy painting watercolours of our travels around the world. I also paint for others who would like reminders of there favourite places. Most of my paintings are painted from photos that I have taken, or taken by others. This blog shows some paintings from Yvonne's and my travels together. Have look at my other Blog www.aquarellesdefrance.wordpress.com

Posted on May 10, 2016, in Kent in the UK, Paintings from our travels, Seascapes, Sunderland Flying Boat, Travels with a Brush, Watercolours and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 5 Comments.

  1. I don’t know what a Thames barge is, but they look very pretty! Interesting about the different papers – I know very little about watercolor except I wish I knew how to do it. Always wanted to. As usual, I admire yours very much!

    Like

    • Hi Paige
      Many thanks for the comment. As a result I have decided to add a new Page to the blog with some barge info. They are, like Oast Houses, very specific to the South and East of England.
      Brian

      Like

  2. As a watercolor beginner, I love finding sites like yours. Your paintings are very inspiring. I love the colors. Absolutely charming!

    Like

  3. Thank you for the comment and follow,glad you like them.
    Brian

    Like

  4. Beautiful. Such a talent you have!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: